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Orange-Rhubarb Muffins

 Sweet oranges are paired with tart in season rhubarb, for moist and flavoursome muffins. Adorned with a crunchy sugar topping, you can enjoy them without the added butter or jam.

Rhubarb Muffins

Growing up, I along with my siblings and our friends often enjoyed fresh rhubarb from our backyard. Back then we would dip the rhubarb in a cup full of sugar and munch away on the tart stems, bathed in sweetness. Thinking about it, still makes my taste buds pucker.

When I moved away, I missed having rhubarb in reach to bake with. My mom would sometimes bring me stalks to use when she would come visit, but it just isn't the same as having your own patch growing in the backyard. About 5 yrs ago, my mom suggested she bring part of her plant with them, when they came to visit, so I could plant it in my yard. I had decided to plant it in an oversized planter, which worked out perfectly, since it was much easier to bring with us, when we had to move last Spring. 

My rhubarb plant has been very plentiful so far this year, and I've been baking with rhubarb for a few weeks now. The kids are loving it and I even threw rhubarb into some 1 point muffins for myself. I just love how the rhubarb softens when baked and love the flavour contrast it gives to desserts. I grew up enjoying many rhubarb recipes and enjoy finding new recipes with rhubarb.

Rhubarb Muffins

What is Rhubarb?

Rhubarb are edible stalks from the Rheum species of plants, which can be cooked and used for food. The large leaves are high in levels of oxalic acid, which makes them inedible. In the 18th century, rhubarb was used only for medicinal purposes. No one knows at what point a hybrid was developed and culinary rhubarb originated. Although it is regarded as a vegetable, rhubarb is usually paired with fruit and sugar.

What can I do with Rhubarb?

With it's bitter and sour taste, rhubarb is usually paired with sugar. It became a popular addition to deserts after sugar became widely available in England, back in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today rhubarb is still used primarily in baking, usually paired with strawberries to balance the bitter flavour.

Rhubarb Muffins

When is Rhubarb in Season?

While rhubarb grows from February to August, it is best used between the months of April and June. Stalks grown in early spring and late summer tend to be delicate, while April-June growth is more robust and flavourful. When picking rhubarb, look for crisp, firm and plump stalks, with deep green leaves that are not wilted.

What Ingredients do I Need to Make Rhubarb Muffins?

  • Rhubarb- use firm plump stalks, which have been peeled and chopped
  • Egg- used as a binder, you can substitute flax egg to make these muffins Vegan
  • Sugar- this recipe calls for granulated white sugar. Brown sugar and coconut sugar can be used in the same amount, if desired
  • Oil- use your favourite light tasting oil, such as canola oil, or avocado oil
  • Oranges- I prefer to use the juice from the oranges I zest for this recipe. Pure orange juice from concentrate can also be used
  • Flour- I used all purpose flour, but a mixture of whole wheat and all purpose would work just as well
  • Vanilla- this adds a nice depth of flavour to the muffins
  • Leavening agent- baking soda and baking powder help make these muffins light and airy
Rhubarb Muffins

How do I make Rhubarb Muffins?

  • Rhubarb muffins are a combination of egg, sugar, fat, flour and rhubarb, which bake up to tender and fluffy bites of goodness.
  • Start by whisking an egg with sugar, oil and a pinch of salt. Add in orange zest and the juice of a few oranges. 
  • Mix the flour, baking powder and soda, in a separate bowl and toss in the rhubarb to coat it with flour. 
  • Add the dry ingredients to the wet and mix until just combined. 
  • Fill a muffin tin, that has been fitted with paper liners and bake until golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
PIN IT!!!

Equipment needed for this recipe
  • mixing bowls
  • 12 cup muffin tin
  • paper liners
  • measuring cups for dry and liquid measures
  • measuring spoons
  • citrus reamer (to juice the oranges)
  • zester
  • whisk
  • spatula
  • large cookie scoop
Orange-Rhubarb Muffins

3/4 C sugar
1 egg
1/4 C avocado oil
1/4 tsp salt
1 Tbs orange zest
3/4 C orange juice (juice of 2 large oranges)
1 tsp vanilla
2 C all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 C rhubarb, peeled and chopped to small pieces
2 tsp sugar

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a 12 count muffin tin with paper liners.

In a large mixing bowl whisk together the sugar, egg, oil and salt, until smooth.

Add in the orange zest, orange juice and vanilla, whisking until well combined.

In a smaller mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder and baking soda. Add in the rhubarb, tossing to coat in flour.

Pour the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients. Using a spatula, mix the batter until the flour has just been combined. 

Using a large cookie scoop, scoop batter into the prepared muffin tin. Sprinkle with remaining 2 teaspoons of sugar.

Bake for 20 minutes, or until muffins are golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.


Comments

  1. I like the combination of orange and rhubarb :) These muffins looks so good

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are the perfect balance of sweet and tart!

      Delete
  2. I never would have thought about orange with rhubarb. Such an inventive combination!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right? Usually you think of strawberries with rhubarb. This is a wonderful combination as well!

      Delete
  3. Well, now I know what I'm doing with the rhubarb in my garden. I've never tried orange and rhubarb together but that is about to change!

    ReplyDelete
  4. These sound wonderful. I haven't had rhubarb in years, now I need to go find some!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hopefully you can! I use to find it at the farmer's markets here, when I didn't have a plant to harvest.

      Delete
  5. Beautiful! I just got some fresh rhubarb sticks from my allotment and was debating what to do with it as I don't really know much variation other than sponge and jam.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you enjoyed them, if you did try them. Such a delicious combination.

      Delete
  6. These look so delish! I've never even had rhubarb before so will have to try it out!

    ReplyDelete
  7. These look so delicious! So moist and tender. Gonna try them this weekend. thanks for the recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  8. These look wonderful! I’ve always been scared to use rhubarb as I read somewhere if you cut it wrong it can make you sick.. but this looks like it’s worth a try! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The only thing you need to make sure, is not to eat the leaves. The stalks are perfectly safe to eat. I hope you do try rhubarb. It will change your life :)

      Delete

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